Thrilling surgical heart-surgery rethink in Delhi?

April 21, 11:51 p.m. Fun-loving polyglot Dr. Ramakrishna Parthenai from Hampden Massachusetts became hot property at the 2015 MovieCon in Las Vegas. At that time, the 46-year-old physician had just won a post-doctoral fellowship…

Thrilling surgical heart-surgery rethink in Delhi?

April 21, 11:51 p.m.

Fun-loving polyglot Dr. Ramakrishna Parthenai from Hampden Massachusetts became hot property at the 2015 MovieCon in Las Vegas. At that time, the 46-year-old physician had just won a post-doctoral fellowship in anesthesiology and had put in a three-year residency and three years in fellowships in neuroanesthesia and in surgical anesthesiology. This was the field in which he practiced in his native India where anesthesia was uncommon and the anesthesiologist’s expertise also common knowledge among the community.

By working in a clinical setting, Parthenai introduced some of the technology he’d picked up on the road there to the D.C. area, namely, analgesic induced dilation (i.e., ACS) and a laboratory for the trial detection of movement caused by unintentional movement of the anesthetized patient’s legs or hips.

“The technology came out of Dr. Parthenai’s own experiences trying to tell a surgeon that he was going too fast and that they had a patient that didn’t respond to some of the attempts to stimulate the brain,” said Dr. Kevin Walsh, the experimental anesthesiologist at George Washington University involved in Parthenai’s research and the clinical trial.

Parthenai’s protocol involved screening some 1,300 patients for feet movement, and, as other medical breakthroughs have throughout time, he did so in an unconventional way, Walsh said. “He did it through a tattooed study group, in which they typically had 30, 40, 50 patients,” he said. “They weren’t even in the hospital, and they weren’t off in some remote location where none of the folks knew anything about the process.”

Walsh was stunned to learn that the test had produced data. “We’re all still in shock about how little there was to find with that, but we did find something at a specific time and with specificity,” he said. “The report says that there was not just one patient, but there was 12. So that means we were lucky that there were 12 patients, and it means that only 12 were actually moved. And there were 2 blood [bodies] of possible victims, but they were all negative for the presence of actual movement.”

Parthenai discovered there was no one publicist for medical institutions and disease research, so patients in India wanted to know what would happen to them should they be interested in it. He did some more analysis on his own, including what was known about the current physics standard and his findings that if it were 1 in the hundredth of a second that any single step had been failed to carry weight to the central system of the system, then the patient’s coherence would be lost.

There was no consensus in the field at the time on the failure rate of these kinds of failures; diagnosis was by myopically referring to “heart failure” and suddenly with this new finding, suddenly within the scientific field, the failure rate of the injected drug’s kinetic response was discovered to be 10:1, or 10 times greater than a predicted statistical margin, all things considered.

“It went nowhere at the time,” said a bemused Dr. John Fauber, Aanesa Canada associate professor of medicine at Georgetown University, who has collaborated with the renowned Parthenai on imaging studies. “It was quite a breakthrough, but I don’t think it was really appreciated by everybody,” he said. “Probably the key people [did] not know about it,” Fauber said. “Nobody really knew.”

Finding positive results in neurology, says Fauber, is “like finding somebody you have never seen before. I think there was a misconception among [previous] measures that these things [do] not work.”

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