The House is poised to have the fewest voting days since 1864

The House is on track to have the fewest number of voting days since 1864, which is largely thanks to one member’s constitutional amendment push for the Electoral College to award the presidency solely…

The House is poised to have the fewest voting days since 1864

The House is on track to have the fewest number of voting days since 1864, which is largely thanks to one member’s constitutional amendment push for the Electoral College to award the presidency solely on the number of electoral votes the state has.

Nancy Pelosi, the Democrat who was speaker when the two sessions occurred, said at a forum in her home district last week that the gerrymandered district lines — in many states — are only one contributing factor. “This is another enabler for obstruction,” Pelosi said, noting that the block is being driven by “some by principle and some for expediency.”

The 113th Congress, which began in January, will have four days fewer voting days than it did in the last session. In January, the House started the week on Jan. 3 with 1,947 voting days and 1,972 voting days on Jan. 25. And since then, the average number of days in the session has dropped to 1,897 (75 days) since March 23 and just 1,845 (82 days) since Jan. 22.

In an email to one reporter, Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) said, “This just shows how much more attention [the gerrymandering] has gotten.”

Pelosi was asked about the issue at the community event, according to NBC News.

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