The Double-Edged Sword of Health Care

Chris Kyle, MSN Radio Distinguished Service Medal. By Carlos Watson, MSN Radio Distinguished Service Medal, Yale Law School, NFL Network and Tee Times. WHAT’S REALITY? The country is currently undergoing the most severe economic…

The Double-Edged Sword of Health Care

Chris Kyle, MSN Radio Distinguished Service Medal.

By Carlos Watson, MSN Radio Distinguished Service Medal, Yale Law School, NFL Network and Tee Times.

WHAT’S REALITY?

The country is currently undergoing the most severe economic downturn in at least a decade. A jobs freefall, a depression, is all-too-real. In light of this fact, even the sickest-of-ill will turn a blind eye to the delicious irony of the Bearded Wonder in Nevada proposing a single-payer health care program.

Under-privileged Americans are struggling to pay the bills, be unable to find affordable health care, and to feel some degree of economic victory. Wanna bet that if they shared their economic elation with Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, and Michael Dell—then their love for the industries they often spearhead would vanish like a wet, smoldering ember? Because the fate of Silicon Valley and America’s economy has a direct correlation to their belief that Health Care is personal.

The impacts of this new wrinkle to the battle for personal democracy continues to make the media sound sad and repentant. In response to the logical existence of Hillary Clinton’s emails, which does not discredit her credibility, CNN responded with, “CLINTON HISTORY.” Last week in a Times editorial, the question, “Why are we so desperate to believe that half the electorate is racist?” was considered relevant. Not only does this veritable admission prove that the baby was in the bib, it also reveals the twin realities of health care and health care costs.

The herd mentality:

Based on a 10-year average analysis of the Consumer Price Index (CPI), a five-year study of doctors’ fees, and an 18-year study of premiums, only about 40 percent of the cost of a health care plan is directly related to health care, and medical expenses account for 57 percent of the price of an American health plan. In other words, the actual price paid for health care in the U.S. has increased roughly 6.5 percent a year for the past 5 years, and an average $4,364 per year. Is that not the price we should all be paying in order to provide some certainty and rest for patients?

Then there’s the 2.9 trillion value of the U.S. government’s Medicare program. Consider that if every American wished to contribute $4,364 to the healthcare plan of each fellow citizen, we would provide a substantially more affordable plan at a world-class standard.

Unfortunately, Health Care is not a quintessential American value. The masses have always preferred avoiding the predictable and the costly. Health Care has long been considered less than the primary driver of the American way of life. States like Ohio, Arizona, and Minnesota, that did their hardest for the Great Recession, still run the largest percentage of all age groups (in other words, the oldest and oldest) on prescription drugs.

Our health system has become so unjust that our government has bent over backwards to protect insurance companies, claiming financial hardship as the main reason for why a single-payer system is a given and wholly unacceptable.

Medicare is not nearly as unwieldy and complex as government-administered health care does. Medicare and the private insurance marketplace have vastly different needs, and the public’s health continues to suffer from this split between the public and the private sector.

The costs of health care are steep and we continue to willfully look the other way. Bernie Sanders’ single-payer system may actually help reduce health care costs (and Medicare expenditure) now.

MEDICAID (Preventive and Primary Health Care) adds to the costs of Medicare. The 2.9 trillion government asset is not an easy target to confront, but the repercussions are all too real. Take the case of the obese mom-of-three born premature who needed life-saving hysterectomy, but who was unable to pay for it.

His personal situation was visited upon everyone who asked him how the cash did not go to the neonatal intensive care unit.

Never! NO WAY! Medicare is paying, but Medicaid is the reason no one in her right mind could pay for that surgery. And take Medicaid for a major repair of her home, or a share of her mortgage.

They were both unable to pay for the routine healthcare because Medicaid was blocking the money from Medicare. The whole system was a twisted, sick bank account that would push the sicker man further into the safety net than he ever dreamed.

Robert Sobol: MSN Radio, NBC Sports

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