Spectacular Northern Lights Sighting: Why All the Clues Are Hidden Under a Blank Space

Photo LONDON — A firework show at the Snowdonia National Park in the north of Wales has been titled the Northern Lights, but in the last two weeks, several people have spotted explosions during…

Spectacular Northern Lights Sighting: Why All the Clues Are Hidden Under a Blank Space

Photo

LONDON — A firework show at the Snowdonia National Park in the north of Wales has been titled the Northern Lights, but in the last two weeks, several people have spotted explosions during displays of the phenomenon that almost always happen in the far north.

It had been calculated that the Aurora Borealis, the northern lights, would be at their most visible on May 29 and May 30, but that didn’t stop people from watching from the beach in Wildwel, Britain, on Sunday. A video taken at the beach shows high-speed flashes of lightning and bright purple light.

A report from The Mirror said “explosions” were visible in the sky on Sunday evening at around 7 p.m. There have been concerns that an insect invasion might be a contributor to recent light show sightings.

It comes two weeks after auroras were spotted from all across Britain at different times of the day and night.

The phenomenon can appear as light trails or as shooting stars as the sun ionizes gases in the sky and causes them to glow.

It’s called the aurora borealis because of how hard it looks like ice falls from the sky.

According to the U.S. National Science Foundation, “Aurora displays are rare, even when oriented in the exact right direction, because the flow of energy from the sun is uneven.”

Meteor showers, called Perseids, are best described as shooting stars. They’re created by the shooting out of asteroids and comets that enter the Earth’s orbit, usually at roughly the same time as the Earth enters their orbit.

Video by The Defiance Valley.

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