Man who killed 6-month-old son refused parole

By Krystal Dunnan, CNN • Updated 18th April 2017 A Saskatchewan man who pleaded guilty to a deadly crash that killed four people — including a six-month-old boy — after he got drunk and…

Man who killed 6-month-old son refused parole

By Krystal Dunnan, CNN • Updated 18th April 2017

A Saskatchewan man who pleaded guilty to a deadly crash that killed four people — including a six-month-old boy — after he got drunk and was speeding while driving a car full of children is again denied parole by a parole board.

Bryan Morton pleaded guilty in May to four counts of dangerous driving causing death and four counts of dangerous driving causing bodily harm after a horrific incident in July 2015.

Morton was driving 70 mph (113 kph) when he crashed his SUV into a ditch at about 80 mph (129 kph) in northern Saskatchewan, police said at the time. All five occupants were ejected from the vehicle.

A 6-month-old boy named Tyler Daney was the only one seriously injured in the crash, but he died at a Saskatoon hospital a few days later, according to the province’s Ministry of Justice. His two siblings — ages 2 and 5 — and a 20-year-old woman died at the scene. The two other children, aged 13 and 9, survived.

The tragic incident sparked a string of copycat tragedies that spurred public outrage.

Morton was sentenced to 10 years in prison, minus credit for time served.

His wife, Kalli-Lynn Morton, a 27-year-old girl and a man who was on a bike were killed in separate crashes that month.

On Tuesday, the board rejected Morton’s bid for full parole.

“While the offender shows some insight into his factors contributing to his offending, and he is taking proactive measures to address his issues, there are still relevant concerns. The offender continues to show no remorse for his actions and there is no evidence of acceptance by him of responsibility,” the written decision said.

The board noted that Morton’s lack of insight into his own behavior has been “the primary reason for denial of previous parole.”

“With no context, it appears that the offender isn’t aware that this is the same outcome that people experience when they kill in his situation. And he does not seem to recognize that he could avoid this type of situation if he were willing to make the necessary adjustments to his lifestyle,” the board said.

In its written decision, the board noted that Morton has “significant therapeutic difficulties.”

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