How to travel without leaving the house

If you are flying you may have noticed that things are starting to get a little crowded, thanks to the summer vacations and the World Cup. The International Air Transport Association reports a 4.2…

How to travel without leaving the house

If you are flying you may have noticed that things are starting to get a little crowded, thanks to the summer vacations and the World Cup. The International Air Transport Association reports a 4.2 percent uptick in seats on international and domestic routes. Tighter airline capacity helped push up fares, with international travel up 5.1 percent while domestic fares jumped 5.5 percent. Most Americans travel the year-round, and experts predict that will continue as more millennials begin planning vacations. The summer travel season is winding down, but don’t leave the air on. Some helpful tips from Airlinepassengers.org, an organization composed of the more than 800,000 air travelers who have written to IATA, including practices airlines should follow to attract passengers.

1. Use half your luggage, especially if you are re-booking from another airline

The most memorable travel experiences are from the easyJet rules (they will move people’s luggage around if they need it) and the difference between coach and first class. If you’re re-booking, use less baggage. If you are traveling with family, use smaller luggage.

2. Keep a few pieces of luggage in different stores and carry a few of them with you at all times

At least two, preferably three at a time.

3. Avoid time-consuming waits

Those extra pages at the immigration desk, paying extra to check in by computer (have you seen that CNN headline about cost?). Don’t do it. They are not worth the aggravation. These times can occur in public places including hotels, car rental facilities, and in low security areas. If your travel is primarily for work, don’t check in by fax at the airport unless you are lucky enough to be traveling in a secure room.

4. Brush up on your language skills and how to communicate with customs officers. In airports, it could be difficult.

It was mostly spoken off the record at the meeting, but the conversation was that language and learning it is one of the keys to a successful trip. For example, travelers who can express themselves in a particular tongue may have easier time. In that vein, a new IATA study noted that the most successful people tend to be well-traveled Europeans. Americans are much less well-traveled and may be discouraged by how difficult it may be to learn a new language. In addition, many travelers don’t bother to learn a new language when they’re on a cruise, a cruise ship is a cruise ship. Learning to communicate can be an important part of making a trip go as well as possible.

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