How a London home interiors studio tackles eccentricity

Written by By Hannah Iparra, CNN Don’t tell the leading home interiors studio up in London, where ethically-sourced woods and locally-sourced wood is a key feature of its interiors — it has work literally…

How a London home interiors studio tackles eccentricity

Written by By Hannah Iparra, CNN

Don’t tell the leading home interiors studio up in London, where ethically-sourced woods and locally-sourced wood is a key feature of its interiors — it has work literally under glass to prove it.

Omicron, which specializes in lightweight, modular plywood interiors, is utilizing a batch of non-traditional materials in its latest show. The vessels, which retain the trend of vintage-meets-ecofab — a reference often made in furniture design — combine gravity-defying form with a seamless yet distinct impact on the cabin space.

A new work by Omicron

Visitors will be able to see the irregular shape of the Peeled Submerged House up close — its polycarbonate shell is accompanied by 32 millimeter ceramic tiles that provide a hard surface that absorbs light and absorbs heat.

In terms of color, color and pattern can be arranged to form a maze of color. In the installation, as in the room, shadings that run along one wall are surrounded by another wall. The resulting look evokes a surreal world that rests on one’s eye.

Effortlessly local

The Peeled Submerged House by Omicron

The studio’s new work falls in line with its ethos of striving for inclusivity.

“It’s an effort to bridge that gap between a traveler, but also feel like it could be a home,” says Omicron associate director of marketing Siobhan Cole. “We’re talking about scale, what it would be like to have people walking around that part of the journey.”

As well as creating a striking way to traverse without weight, Omicron’s local-oriented approach also fits in with its changing and global clientele, who have shifted from domestic destinations to visiting the island of Kiritimati in the Maldives.

“The language is one that is quite akin to the international travel,” says Cole. “There’s a desire to be able to mix international in the destination and blend it with local forms.”

How an interiors studio continues to evolve

On top of that, the designs still adhere to the values of being organic and structurally integrated. Whether it’s the strong patterns in the more “woven” pieces, or the lush rock of the “multiform” piece, the intent is to represent the natural world around you while embracing the very essence of travel.

“Each design speaks for itself,” says Cole. “It’s another chance to paint a blank canvas.”

“We’re constantly looking at making something that isn’t meant to be compared to anything else,” she says. “You can’t be doing comparisons when you’re trying to achieve a quality which is kind of ageless.”

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