Fans of J&J will be able to buy jerky directly from a store in Africa

Back in 2013, the company Sadakisa partnered with J. & J. and did a social media campaign called #ThinTap Campaign. The idea was for all professional males in Africa to attend a local football…

Fans of J&J will be able to buy jerky directly from a store in Africa

Back in 2013, the company Sadakisa partnered with J. & J. and did a social media campaign called #ThinTap Campaign. The idea was for all professional males in Africa to attend a local football game and sign a pledge to monitor, to love, to be healthy and to have one day off to go to the doctor. The idea wasn’t an easy one, with the tagline “One day a month – to watch soccer” a bit ambiguous, to say the least. Sadakisa (the word means “to have wonderful partners”) continued with the campaign, sponsoring the national teams of Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and Zambia. Now the initiative is taking a new form.

On May 7, Sadakisa was granted a license by the National Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (NHRA) to market and distribute the J & J Lo+Mims jerky.

Given the history of J & J Lo+Mims (sources say it dates back to the 1950s), the milestone for the company is clear. The company has been the biggest player in the and J & J is betting on African marketing and retail sales. Sadakisa signed an agreement with J & J to market J & J sports food items in Africa, consisting of over 600,000 tons of raw meat and 300,000 tons of processed products, and says that they plan to open 200 stores in Zambia in 2019 alone.

The Asaba, Nigeria-based company is working with local food companies to expand their shops and has extended their partnership with United Products Company (UPC), who works with NHRA to get products to markets, hoping to convince manufacturers to participate in the program.

According to Maria S. Rascoe, President of Asaba-based Asaba Zagreb Property Investments Inc., investors in Asaba continue to be excited about the deal, according to the Investor Journal, “Asaba Zagreb believes that, by supporting companies that are local and credible, the ventures will be quickly recognized by the general public as being good investments.”

Read the full story at Financial Times.

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